The Vaccines For Children (VFC) program is a federally funded program that provides vaccines at no cost to children who might not otherwise be vaccinated because of inability to pay. CDC buys vaccines at a discount and distributes them to grantees—i.e., state health departments and certain local and territorial public health agencies—which in turn distribute them at no charge to those private physicians’ offices and public health clinics registered as VFC providers. This helps ensure that all children in the U.S. have a better chance of getting their recommended vaccinations on schedule.

Your child is eligible for the VFC program if he or she is younger than 19 and meets one of the following criteria:

  • Medicaid-eligible
  • Uninsured
  • American Indian or Alaska Native: As defined by the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (25 U.S.C. 1603)
  • Underinsured (underinsured children are only eligible for VFC Vaccines through Federally Qualified Health Centers and Rural Health Clinics).

Ask your doctor if he or she is a VFC Program provider. There are over 40,000 doctors enrolled in the VFC Program nationwide.

Learn more about The Vaccines For Children Program through:
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention